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Small Business Assistance

The President signed a $484 billion stimulus bill that will provide additional funding to small business loans, hospitals and expanded coronavirus testing. Under the deal, the Paycheck Protection Program will receive more than $300 billion in additional funding, and $60 billion will go toward SBA disaster loans. The legislation:

  • Provides a total of $659 billion to the PPP, including the original $347 billion in funding, which was depleted
  • Increases the authorization level for the Emergency Economic Injury Disaster (EIDL) to $20 billion
  • Allows agricultural enterprises as defined by section 18(b) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 647(b)) with not more than 500 employees to receive EIDL grants and loans
  • Sets aside the following amounts for the PPP to be made by the following institutions:
  • $30 billion for loans made by small Insured Depository Institutions and Credit Unions that have assets between $10 billion and $50 billion; and
  • $30 billion for loans made by Community Financial Institutions, Small Insured Depository Institutions, and Credit Unions with assets less than $10 billion

The federal government created the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to support small businesses during this pandemic. The PPP provides small businesses with funds to pay up to 8 weeks of payroll costs, including benefits like healthcare coverage. Funds can also be used to pay interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities.

  • The PPP is a low-interest loan (1%); however, funds used for up to eight weeks of payroll costs, interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities will be fully forgiven.
  • Loan payments are deferred for six months. No collateral or personal guarantees are required. Neither the government nor lenders will charge small businesses any fees.
  • Forgiveness is based on the employer maintaining or quickly rehiring employees and maintaining salary levels. Forgiveness will be reduced if full-time headcount declines, or if salaries and wages decrease.
  • Small businesses with 500 or fewer employees—including nonprofits, veterans organizations, tribal concerns, self-employed individuals, sole proprietorships, and independent contractors— are eligible. Businesses with more than 500 employees are eligible in certain industries.
  • You can apply through any existing Small Business Administration 7(a) lender or through any federally insured depository institution, federally insured credit union, and Farm Credit System institution that is participating. A list of participating lenders as well as additional information and full terms can be found at www.sba.gov.

Other SBA Resources

Funding Programs or Small Business COVID-19 Page

Common Issues Small Businesses May Encounter:

  • Capital Access – Incidents can strain a small business's financial capacity to make payroll, maintain inventory and respond to market fluctuations (both sudden drops and surges in demand). Businesses should prepare by exploring and testing their capital access options so they have what they need when they need it. See SBA’s capital access resources.
  • Workforce Capacity – Incidents have just as much impact on your workers as they do your clientele. It’s critical to ensure they have the ability to fulfill their duties while protected.
  • Inventory and Supply Chain Shortfalls – While the possibility could be remote, it is a prudent preparedness measure to ensure you have either adequate supplies of inventory for a sustained period and/or diversify your distributor sources in the event one supplier cannot meet an order request.
  • Facility Remediation/Clean-up Costs – Depending on the incident, there may be a need to enhance the protection of customers and staff by increasing the frequency and intensity by which your business conducts cleaning of surfaces frequently touched by occupants and visitors. Check your maintenance contracts and supplies of cleaning materials to ensure they can meet increases in demand.
  • Insurance Coverage Issues – Many businesses have business interruption insurance; Now is the time to contact your insurance agent to review your policy to understand precisely what you are and are not covered for in the event of an extended incident.
  • Changing Market Demand – Depending on the incident, there may be access controls or movement restrictions established which can impede your customers from reaching your business. Additionally, there may be public concerns about public exposure to an incident and they may decide not to go to your business out of concern of exposing themselves to greater risk. SBA’s Resources Partners and District Offices have trained experts who can help you craft a plan specific to your situation to help navigate any rapid changes in demand.
  • Marketing – It’s critical to communicate openly with your customers about the status of your operations, what protective measures you’ve implemented, and how they (as customers) will be protected when they visit your business. Promotions may also help incentivize customers who may be reluctant to patronize your business.
  • Plan – As a business, bring your staff together and prepare a plan for what you will do if the incident worsens or improves. It’s also helpful to conduct a tabletop exercise to simulate potential scenarios and how your business management and staff might respond to the hypothetical scenario in the exercise. For examples of tabletop exercises, visit FEMA’s website at: https://www.fema.gov/emergency-planning-exercises

Local Assistance: SBA works with a number of local partners to counsel, mentor, and train small businesses. The SBA has 68 District Offices, as well as support provided by its Resource Partners, such as SCORE offices, Women’s Business Centers, Small Business Development Centers and Veterans Business Outreach Centers. When faced with a business need, use the SBA’s Local Assistance Directory to locate the office nearest you.